By Christopher Korotky

What do you get when a Twitter troll takes on one of the most talented and respected ballerinas in the world? Well, we have the very answer right here!

Feature photo by American Ballet Theatre

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Misty Copeland – regarded for becoming the first African American woman to be promoted to principal dancer in the American Ballet Theatre’s 75-year history – caught our attention on Instagram this morning when she posted a screenshot of a Twitter user who wrote,

“THIS is why @mistyonpointe is the WORST and why it’s an embarrassment to @ABTBallet to even have her on the roster, much less as a principal dancer. No wonder the rest of the world thinks American ballet is a joke.”

The comment was in response to a YouTube clip of Copeland performing fouetté turns in Swan Lake with the title, “Misty Copeland Swan Lake Fouetté Fail.”

Never one to shy away from making a bold statement, Copeland spoke her mind openly and authentically in a comment under the video soon after, which she also shared on social media. In her statement regarding the issue, Copeland said,

“I’m happy this has been shared because I will forever be a work in progress and will never stop learning. I learn from seeing myself on film and rarely get to. So thank you… All I’ve ever wanted is to bring ballet to more people and to help to diversify it… A ballerina’s career is not, nor should be defined by how many fouettés she executes… I do appreciate the changes in the ballet technique, focused on evolving our technical abilities, but the point is to move people and for them to understand the stories we tell through dance. And that is an incredible responsibility and opportunity I will never take for granted.”

Link in my profile. I’m happy to share this because I will forever be a work in progress and will never stop learning. I learn from seeing myself on film and rarely get to. So thank you. I will always reiterate that I am by no means the best in ballet. I understand my position and what I represent. I know that I’m in a very unique position and have been given a rare platform. All I’ve ever wanted is to bring ballet to more people and to help to diversify it. I’ve worked extremely hard to be where I am and I believe that what I bring to the table is authentic artistry with a unique point of view through my life experiences, and my unusual path and upbringing. Also as a black woman and black ballerina. I would love to see all of the incredible deserving black dancers get the opportunities that I have. I will forever be humbled and extremely grateful for the fact that I get to do what I love for a living, that I get to do all of the incredible roles that I do, in particular Swan Queen. There are so many ballerinas that never get to experience dancing the most iconic and demanding role in a ballerinas repertoire. I have so so so much respect for what I do and for the ballerinas I stand on the shoulders of. I’m in awe everyday that I am a part of such an incredible art form that has changed and enriched my life in so many ways and that I get to do it all with ABT. I don’t decide who’s promoted or what roles I dance. I never envisioned myself as the Swan Queen after being in the company for almost 15 years before i was given the opportunity. I have such deep and conflicting feelings connected to Swan Lake. As a black woman and as a ballerina given the chance to take on this role. I often question if I deserve to perform this role. My conclusion, I do. Some of the most memorable Swan Queens in history have brought so much more to this role without having to present the incredible and evolved technique of today by doing insane tricks that bring some to see Swan Lake. For the anticipated 32 fouettés. But it is so much more than that.

A post shared by Misty Copeland (@mistyonpointe) on

Link in my profile. People come to see ballet for the escape. For the experience of being moved through our movement and artistry, not to score us on the technicality of what we do. This is why ballet is not a sport. A ballerinas career is not, nor should be defined by how many fouettés she executes. They are a part of the choreography to tell a story of pulling off the entrancement she holds over prince Siegfried. The point is to finish the 3rd act with a whirlwind movement that sucks him in just one last time before it’s revealed that Odile is not Odette. This is the incredible beauty of ballet. To move people. I’m happy to have this dialogue because it’s something I believe in whole heartedly. The history of ballet and it’s origin of pure freedom and expression is what we need to hold onto. Not to come into the theatre as a critic armed with judgement. I do appreciate the changes in the ballet technique, focused on evolving our technical abilities, but the point is to move people and for them to understand the stories we tell through dance. And that is an incredible responsibility and opportunity I will never take for granted.

A post shared by Misty Copeland (@mistyonpointe) on

And while some weighed in with negative comments, the Instagram faithful showed up in force to tell Misty, “we’re here for you!”

“You are a class act and a beautiful credit to the art of ballet,” wrote one user.

Such grace and class. You will forever be an idol for me and the world of Ballet,” wrote another.

Even celebrities began to chime in, showing their support for the famed ballerina!

“You are an incredible inspiration, an immensely talented beauty. We [heart emoji] you @mistyonpointe,” Gwyneth Paltrow said.

"People always have some ridiculousness to say. Keep shining. Keep doing you. [Your] power is beyond what people are typing on a keyboard. Much love," Twitch said.

It’s worth noting that the account for said troll no longer shows up via a search on Twitter. The moral of the story? Don’t mess with Misty – she’s a national treasure. We got your back, Misty! Keep doing you and inspiring the world.

We love you, and thank you for gracing the November 2014 cover of Inside Dance!

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